Symbolic Tribunal on Sexual Violence

This past Monday, September 26, I had the opportunity to participate in a Symbolic Tribunal against Sexual Violence in the Context of the Colombian Armed Conflict, held at the Universidad Naciónal in Bogotá. It was important event that helped bring to light some of the violence that happens as a result of the armed conflict in Colombia and the impunity that surrounds these cases. I wrote an article about it for Colombia Reports, a Colombian news website published in English. You can read the full article here: Bogota university holds ‘court’ against sexual violence.

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My Journey to Obtain a Colombian Work Visa

also: How to Obtain a Colombian Work Visa in Venezuela.

View of Cucuta from my hotel room

I left Bogotá Wednesday morning and flew to Cucuta, the closest Colombian city with an airport to Venezuela. I was told that going to Venezuela is the easiest and cheapest way for a foreigner to obtain a Colombian visa. For some absurd reason that I cannot figure out, in order to obtain a visa for Colombia, one must go out of the country to a Colombian Consulate in another country. I do not understand why I can’t get a Colombian visa in Colombia, but that’s how it is. And before you say anything, Dear Latino Readers, I know. I know the visa process is extremely difficult and frustrating for you guys, to go to either the States or Europe. But that doesn’t make Colombia’s rules any less absurd or exasperating.

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Happy Love and Friendship Day!

Today is the Día de Amor y Amistad, or in English, Love and Friendship Day. It’s the Colombian version of Valentine’s Day, but instead of being just for couples or lovers or crushes, it’s also about friends. It is celebrated every year on the third weekend of September.

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Bus Etiquette in Colombia

Bus in Bogotá

Do you ever pay attention to how people interact on buses? Or public transportation in general? It’s quite an interesting microcosm, if you think about it; all of these strangers squeezed into a tight place, arms, shoulders, legs, and butts all touching with people you’ve never met before and will probably never see again.

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¿Como te llamas?

Over a year ago when I first arrived in Barranquilla, I was at school setting up my Kindergarten classroom. I had to make name cards for my kids´ desks. One of my little girls was named Maria García Rojas, but her name was too long to fit on the card, so I just wrote Maria García, thinking it was no problem. I was wrong.

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